Are you WILD about wildlife?

If so, then mark your calendars! Join photographer and author Bruce Taubert at enthralling photography workshop on April 28, 2018 at the Boyce Thompson Arboretum (BTA). During this special event, Bruce will narrate photographs, share anecdotes, and explain exposure and composition techniques from 9:00 to 11:00 a.m. He will also answer questions after the class concludes. The session costs $50 for non-members (or $37.50 for Arboretum annual members – who don’t pay separate garden admission). In addition to the two-hour slideshow and class, pre-paid enrollees will get a free copy of his award-winning guidebook, “Wild in Arizona: Photographing Arizona’s Wildlife” (a $25 value).

Bruce’s book spotlights 50 spectacular locations to find diverse animals to photograph across Arizona. It’s packed with 220 color photographs, technical information, instructional wildlife photography tips, “Making the Photo” stories,  a comprehensive checklist of photography basics and gear, and a calendar that predicts year-round wildlife photography opportunities.

For four decades, photographing Arizona wildlife has made Bruce’s life rich with experience and anecdotes, from netting bats after dark, to staying calm while face-to-face with massive bull elk on the Mogollon Rim. He earned a doctorate in wildlife management and retired a few years ago as assistant director for wildlife management at the Arizona Game and Fish Department. He has taught Arizona Highways photo workshops and lectured about wildlife photography at the BTA. Bruce’s work has been published in Arizona Highways, WildBird, Birders’ World, among dozens of other magazines.

To learn more about this photography workshop, visit https://arboretum.ag.arizona.edu/photoclass.html (scroll down to the April 28th event listing). To register, call the arboretum at 520.689.2723 during daytime business hours (8 a.m. to 4 p.m. AZ time). To see more of Taubert’s photos and read more about him at brucetaubert.com.

Hesperaloe bloom. Photo by Colleen Miniuk-Sperry

Paul and I spent the past two weekends at the Boyce Thompson Arboretum teaching our annual “Wild about Wildflowers…and Macro Photography” workshops. A huge THANKS to all who attended and treated us to so much beauty through their own lenses. Lots of good laughs too!

At the arboretum, the Demonstration Garden has the best set of blooms so far, as the perennials like penstemon, coral aloe, Godding verbena, mescal bean (which you have to smell…smells like grape soda!), and a variety of barrel cactus are starting to show their beautiful colors. The Cactus Garden is also coming along, but will display a stronger cactus bloom in the next few weeks. There, we spotted desert marigolds, spiderwort, and even a couple of Mexican gold poppies, lupine, and globemallow.

It’s no surprise that we’re seeing a lack of annuals based on the lack of rain we’ve had this winter. Perennials, however, are showing how they are less affected by low precipitation and will likely continue to bloom over the next several weeks. Places like Boyce Thompson Arboretum, Desert Botanical Gardens, Tohono Chul, and Tucson Botanical Gardens will offer plenty of wildflower photography opportunities as spring turns into summer in the desert.

Near Gonsalez Pass to the west of Boyce Thompson Arboretum, the ocotillo are greening up, and small splashes of color from fairy duster, lupine, and brittlebush dot the desert landscape. Silly Mountain looks brown and burned out–not sure if even the normally reliable brittlebush bloom will happen here this year…

While Paul and I have been busy teaching, we’ve heard rumors of roadside flowers along Highway 60 south of Wickenburg and brittlebush off of Highway 17 north of Anthem. Also, there are reports of several locations in Tucson in bloom per this recently published article: http://tucson.com/thisistucson/5best/tucson-is-blooming-insta-worthy-spots-to-stop-and-smell/article_76700fd0-3132-11e8-b19c-9bd1681345bf.html.

Let us know what you’ve seen out in your wildflower explorations!

The Wild in Arizona team cordially invites you to join us for the opening reception of Paul Gill’s “Wildflower Photography Exhibition” this Saturday, April 1 from 2-4 p.m. at the Boyce Thompson Arboretum near Superior, Arizona.

Stop by to view his breathtakingly beautiful 20 wildflower prints and chat with him about how he made his inspirational images. Paul suggests these photographs “..are some of my favorites from the past 25 years – from grand carpets of wildflowers in large landscapes to more intimate closeups, and getting inside the flowers unseen details.”  Read more about the exhibit at arboretum.ag.arizona.edu/paulgill.html. See more of Paul’s work on his website at paulgillphoto.com.

Paul will also be signing copies of his and Colleen Miniuk-Sperry’s award-winning guidebook, Wild in Arizona: Photographing Arizona’s Wildflowers, A Guide to When, Where, & How.

And bring your camera to make your own images!  Boyce Thompson Arboretum is in full bloom with a plethora of flowers showing off in the Demonstration and Cactus gardens.  The grounds are open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $12.50/person unless you possess an arboretum membership (which provides free entry).  For more information, visit arboretum.ag.arizona.edu/about_us.html.

We’ll see you at Boyce Thompson this Saturday!

Lost Dutchman_01_c

Lost Dutchman looking green for this time of year. Of the limited number that did sprout flowers this year, brittle bush and other perennial shrubs have already passed their peak bloom.

Well, the year of the poppy, it ain’t.  Following ample rain in November and average precipitation in December, the Phoenix area went almost 70 days without a drop of rain during a critical time for the spring wildflower bloom in the desert.  On top of the lack of rain, the low deserts have experienced significantly higher temperatures than normal.  So 2014 isn’t going to go into the record books for our spring bloom.

With the chance of a wide-spread display diminishing each day as fast as our much needed rains did this year, shutterbugs with a careful eye can pick out single blooms to practice their macro techniques out there!  Here’s what we’ve been seeing out there…

BTA_01_c

Healthy globe mallow from the parking lot of the Boyce Thompson Arboretum.

Boyce Thompson Arboretum:  Ample globemallow and desert marigolds in the parking area.  Ice plants along entry walkway showing off pinks and purples while the aloe have sprouted their orange flowers.  The Demonstration Garden has some penstemon, blanket flower, and cactii in bloom, but it’s a smaller scale bloom than what we’re used to at this time of year.

Lost Dutchman:   Ocotillo and hedgehog cactus in bloom near the Saguaro Day Use area.  Brittlebush burned out.  (The ranger suggested some small flowers existed along the Jacob’s Crosscut Trail but I was leading a private workshop and wasn’t able to scout.)

San Tan Regional Mountain:  Ocotillo and a variety of cactus currently in bloom across the park.  Brittle bush past peak.

South Mountain: Specifically along the Pima Canyon & Bajada Trails, the brittle bush bloom is done while the ocotillo and hedgehog cacti are blooming now.

Gonzales Pass:  Palo verde trees showing off brilliant yellows in the median among ocotillo, globemallow, desert marigolds, and some brittle bush.

Silly Mountain:  Brittle bush not looking real promising…

Bartlett Lake:  Scattered brittle bush and globemallow hanging on, but looking pretty burned out otherwise.

Sun City area:  Thanks to the recent construction activities, a nice disturbance bloom of poppies and scorpionweed intermingling is currently happening near the intersection of the new 303 Expressway and Grand Avenue.

Let us know if you’ve seen anything great out there!

We’re keeping our fingers crossed that the upcoming monsoon season (will it start early, given the shift in seasons??) will bring additional moisture to the entire state.  In addition, we’re watching the development of a possible El Nino closely.  The last Climate Prediction Center report suggested a 50% chance of an El Nino developing this summer or fall, so the verdict for this summer’s bloom is still out.  Stay tuned!

Happy shooting!

~Colleen & Paul

Paul_Lost Dog Trail_1

Scorpionweed and strawberry hedgehog cactus along the Lost Dog Wash Trail

Paul_Lost Dog Trail_2

Poppies along Lost Dog Wash Trail in the McDowell Sonoran Preserve

 

Lost Dog Wash Trail:  This trail, as well as other spots in the McDowell Sonoran Preserve takes the cake for peak Mexican gold poppy bloom right now.  According to Paul, who visited yesterday, “It’s screaming out there now!”  In addition to the pretty little yellow flowers, scorpionweed, lupine, and several cacti – including strawberry hedgehog and pincushion – are also showing their colors in this desert landscape.  For maps and trail information visit  www.scottsdaleaz.gov/Assets/Public+Website/preserve/TrailMaps.pdf

Bartlett Lake (location #26 in our “Wild in Arizona: Photographing Arizona’s Wildflowers” book):  The impressive show here continues with fields of poppies across many of the hillsides into this area and along Service Road 459.  Though the abundant poppies on the hillsides around the saddle have peaked, last Saturday, there were still buds waiting to bloom north of the saddle (though not nearly in the same quantity as we saw near the saddle).  Typical for this location, a great mix of blooms are still going strong with cream cups, lupine, chia, chuparosa, and desert marigold being most abundant right now.  The brittlebush and globemallow are either budding or starting to show splashes of color.  Watch for the perennials to peak in 7-10 days here.

Lake Pleasant Regional Park (location #21):  Though the annual bloom of the Mexican gold poppy is in decline after a glorious show, plenty of flowers along the trail make a trip to the Pipeline Canyon Trail still worth the visit.  The perennial bloom of desert globemallow and brittlebush has picked up since last week, but could use a little more time to peak.

Boyce Thompson Arboretum (location #37): The Desert Garden in the Demonstration Garden filled with penstemon, lupine, coral aloe, and an array of other blooms. A walk down the Main Trail from the Visitor Center to the Cactus and Succulent Garden won’t disappoint, as there are Texas mountain laurels, penstemon, some Mexican gold poppies, scorpionweed, and even some early blooming claret cup cactus.

Silly Mountain (location #32):  Speeding by this location at 55 mph along Highway 60, the brittlebush high on the hillside appeared past peak, while the middle section looked at peak, and the flat bottom areas hadn’t even started blooming yet.  Despite the strange (silly?), tiered bloom, plenty of excellent photo ops still exist!

 

Silly Mountain Sunset

The brittlebush bloom at sunset at Silly Mountain, Arizona last Saturday

As expected, last week’s rain followed by a fairly intense warm-up in Arizona’s low desert has made the wildflower bloom progress nicely. I took a spin around to some of my favorite locations this time of year to scout for our upcoming “Wild for Wildflowers: Sonoran Desert” Arizona Highways Photography Workshop and was not disappointed! Here’s what I saw out there:

Flora-tude

A Mexican gold poppy demonstrating attitude – or “Flora-tude” at Lake Pleasant on Sunday

GO NOW – LOCATIONS AT PEAK:

  • Lake Pleasant: (location #21 in our “Wild in Arizona: Photographing Arizona’s Wildflowers” book) This location is AT PEAK or just slightly beyond when it comes to annuals.  The entire hillside along the south end of the Pipeline Canyon Trail has burst into yellow with Mexican gold poppies and California poppies.  I even saw a handful of albino poppies on the west side of the trail – something I’ve never seen outside of Bartlett Lake!  There is a nice mix of other flowers, including lupine, blue dicks, scorpionweed, and fiddleneck.  A very nice stand of bright orange globemallow begs for some nice photographs just south of the Pipeline Bridge.  Though the poppies will only last another 7-10 days, the perennials like brittlebush are just starting to bud and show, so watch this location for the perennial bloom over the next two weeks.
  • Silly Mountain:  (location#32) The ridiculously silly brittlebush bloom on this hillside along the highway has started almost a week or two early and will peak likely this week.

KEEP AN EYE ON IN NEXT 7-10 DAYS:

Albino Mexican Gold Poppy

Albino Mexican Gold Poppy at Bartlett Lake on Sunday

  • Bartlett Lake:  (location #26)  The hillsides around the saddle area are looking spectacular right now – poppies, lupine, chuparosa, fiddleneck, cream cups, and chia.  Though the areas north of the saddle along Service Road 459 are definitely showing a solid wildflower bloom – including the white albino and pink poppies! – a stroll through the desert revealed many, many buds still waiting to bloom.  The shooting is great here right now, but I think this area will likely see peak in the next 7-10 days.  Lots of potential still!
  • Silver King Mine Road: (location #38):  Patches of poppies are evident along the east-facing mountain sides as you drive this recently graded dirt road.  A short hike up the hillside will get you to a relatively young patch of poppies.  A scattering of London rocket, fiddleneck, and lupine are also filling in.  The verdict is still out as to whether we’ll see a spectacular bloom here, but there’s enough going on to warrant putting it on the watch list.
  • Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park: (location #37)  Though not prolific yet, thus far, the Arboretum is showing perhaps the most diverse mix of desert blooms – poppies, globemallow, blue dicks, desert marigold, desert filaree, penstemon, popcorn flower, wild cucumber, and Mormon tea – along the Main Trail.  Though good for ample photographic opportunities now, I think this spot will continue to get even better in the weeks ahead.

FORGET IT – SAVE YOUR GAS & TIME:

  • Saddle Mountain:  (location #20)  Unless you’d like to see what the desert looks like in spring when it doesn’t get enough rain, skip this location this year.  There are a few scattered, tiny poppies, some scorpionweed and fiddlneck, three bladderpod mustard blooms, and a ton of small popcorn flower, which my husband suggested looked more like the bottom of the popcorn bag.  Better luck next year…

Have you been out photographing the wildflowers in Arizona?  Tell us what you’ve seen in your outings!  We’d love to hear from you!

~Colleen

Lupine and cream cups at Bartlett Lake

Lupine and cream cups at Bartlett Lake on Sunday

Thanks to an excellent Arizona Highways Photography Workshop “Bryce in Winter” last week, I wasn’t able to get out to chase wildflowers.  However, en route to and from Utah, I made several Arizona-based wildflower observations worthy of sharing:

  • The Joshua trees north of Wickenburg along Highway 93 are starting to bloom, especially beyond the picnic area.  I didn’t have a chance to check out Tres Alamos Wilderness (location #16 in our book), but I’d assume with confidence the Joshua trees there and in this area will continue to show their big cream-colored blooms for at least the next two weeks.
  • Nothing is blooming in Nothing yet (location #15).
  • The south-facing rolling hills south of Lake Pleasant along Highway 74/Carefree Highway are starting to show solid patches of yellow – poppies appear to be blooming quite well here, but didn’t have time to check out Lake Pleasant (location #21) proper to learn of the progress there.

Paul spent the week wandering around Cabeza Prieta, and though he captured some spectacular images of dune primrose and desert sand verbena, the area in bloom is very small and requires an arduous hike to see – not worth the long drive and safety risk.  He also reported that Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument near Ajo (location # ) is a “no-show” for flowers this year.

It seems we aren’t the only ones “wild about wildflowers” this year!  We’ve received some encouraging news from our blog readers within the last few days, including:

  • Jacque and Bob report that the Arizona Trail near the Picketpost Mountains outside of Superior as well as the roadsides near Florence Junction (location #34) has poppies and lupines.
  • Tom suggests that poppies are showing along the Go John Trail (location #25).
  • Bret saw one tiny patch of poppies along the Jacob’s Crosscut Trail in Lost Dutchman State Park (location #31), but not much else in the Superstitions area.
  • Our dear friend Paul W. out at Boyce Thompson Arboretum just posted a first-of-the-season wildflower report at ag.arizona.edu/bta/events/wildflowers.html.
  • The Arizona State Parks Ranger Cam is live!  Keep tabs on what’s blooming around the state at azstateparks.com/rangercam/index.html.

Let’s us know what you’ve seen by leaving us a Comment below!

Weather forecasters are predicting rain for the Phoenix area on Friday and Saturday, with warming temperatures and much sun next week, which should encourage the blooms to continue showing around the Sonoran Desert.

If you’re looking to get ready for photographing wildflowers in Arizona, hear photographic tips, tricks, and inspiration at two upcoming FREE events this week:

  • Thursday, March 7, “Wild About Photographing Arizona’s Wildflowers” at 7 pm at the Northern Arizona University School of Communication (Building #16), Room 119
  • Saturday, March 9, “Mastering Macro Photography” presentations at 11 am and again at 2 pm, first-come, limited seating and book signing event at Tempe Camera

For more information about these two special presentations as well as other upcoming presentations and learning opportunities, be sure to check out our Events page on the Wild in Arizona website.

If you love color in Arizona, you’ll love the entire month of September in the Grand Canyon State!  The ninth month of the year serves as a transition period where the summer heat finally gives into the cooler, refreshing breezes of autumn and the wildflowers dancing in picturesque meadows begin to disappear, paving the way for the on-looking trees to put on their own colorful display.

Thanks to our mild climate – save for summer in the desert – Arizona sees an extended growing season for not only wildflowers, but fall colors across the state.  As the weather changes, leaves on the deciduous trees and bushes begin their multicolored transformation in late September in the higher elevations and last into early January along the riparian areas in the far south.  Yes, early January!

Though we’re sad to see the 2012 wildflower come to an end,  we’re gearing up already for an exciting autumn season ahead!  And we hope you are too!  As we prepare for the new season’s arrival, Paul and I wanted to share our favorite locations to photograph the changing palette of color in Arizona each month.  So mark your calendars and get ready for Mother Nature’s next act!

September

Near Snowbowl Ski Area

Aspen groves and views of the San Francisco Peaks near the Snowbowl Ski Area

  • Paul (P):  The Kaibab Plateau en route to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon starting in late September. The drive from Jacob Lake on Highway 67 to De Motte Park has some of Arizona’s best groves of aspen. A short drive on any forest road in this area will get you deep into the golden forests.
  • Colleen (C):  Near the Snowbowl Ski Area in Flagstaff the last week of September.  A quick and easy stroll from the parking lot leads to abundant aspens, changing seemingly all hues of yellow and orange.  A visit here is a great way to kick off your fall photography season!  (www.arizonasnowbowl.com)

October

Canyon de Chelly

Cottonwood trees in Canyon de Chelly National Monument

  • P:  Upper Christopher Creek area with a short one mile hike into See Canyon in mid-October. See fiery maples without the crowds of Oak Creek Canyon (near Sedona, which also a worthwhile location to visit around this time, so long as you don’t mind a little more company).
  • C: Canyon de Chelly in late October.  An already magical, photogenic canyon gets a splash of color, thanks to the cottonwood trees lining the wash change from summer green to vibrant yellow. (nps.gov/cach)

November

  • P:  Garden Canyon on the Huachuca Army Base out side of Sierra Vista in early November.  A long, bumpy ride along a dirt road pays off with a canyon full of eclectic deciduous trees showing their vivacious fall coats along a small, idyllic flowing creek.
  • C: Pumphouse Wash in early November.  Everyone flocks to the nearby West Fork of Oak Creek – and for good reason!  It’s spectacular! – but when you want to photograph the season’s color in solitude, turn to this quiet canyon to record maples, Oregon grape, and sycamores against the beige Coconino sandstone cliffs.

December

San Pedro River

San Pedro River

  • P:  San Pedro River all month and into January:  The autumnal season in Arizona goes out on a high note here as a ribbon of cottonwoods and sycamore sing the final song of fall along sections of stream from Charleston Road outside of Sierra Vista to Hereford.
  • C:  Hassyampa River Nature Preserve in early December.  While many people in northern latitudes are shoveling snow, the cottonwood trees in this little-known gem are still saying it’s fall in Arizona.

As we’ve done with the wildflowers this year, we’ll post periodic Field Reports here on our blog throughout the season with up-to-date information about color conditions in the various locations we visit and photograph.  Be sure to keep us posted with your findings along the way as well!

In the meantime, if you’re looking to start polishing your photography skills, be sure to join Colleen at the Boyce Thompson Arboretum on Sunday, September 16 for the “Get Ready for Fall” Photo Workshop (more information at arboretum.ag.arizona.edu/photoclass.html, registration required, limited to 12 students).

Happy fall color shooting!
Paul and Colleen

Boyce Thompson Arboretum near Superior AZ. is showing a lot of color in the cactus and agave gardens. Some of the best wildflowers are still great in the Demonstration Garden. This is worth the drive and admission. Saguaros are still budding in most places with good blooms in others, very hit and miss this year. A few shots from this week.

Cactus Gardens

Demonstration GardenCactus Garden

Claret Cups

Wildflowers are burning off now and cactus blooms are peaking. Saguaro’s starting to show and should end the desert bloom in the next month plus. The bloom at the Desert Botanical Garden, Boyce Thompson Arboretum, and Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum are your best bets this year to see the last of the desert wildflowers. Rocky Mountain Iris starting in the high country.

Agave & Penstemon

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